Why Don’t More Schools Teach About The Effects Of Climate Change?

Why Don’t More Schools Teach About The Effects Of Climate Change?

A recent study has shown a pretty stark trend when it comes to one particular subject that kids aren’t being taught in school. What’s more, it’s a subject that has a direct impact on not only the students themselves, but the rest of the world around them.

The subject in question is climate change.

By now, there’s no denying that climate change impacts virtually every living thing on the planet. Despite being so prevalent in our daily lives, it’s still not a staple in the curriculum of most schools in the U.S. We’d wager to say that climate change education would be far more useful than common core mathematics.

Parents aren’t happy about it, either.

National Public Radio (NPR) recently conducted a poll, and the results show that more than 80 percent of the parents polled would like to see schools teach climate change on a regular basis. What’s more, climate change represents one of the few topics these days that is a bipartisan concern. The poll showed that, regardless of whether the parent was republican or democrat, the majority agree that climate change needs to be part of the elementary school curriculum.

Why Don’t More Schools Teach About The Effects Of Climate Change?

The poll also showed that it’s not the teachers who are to blame for the lack of climate change education. In fact, the polls revealed that of those participants who happen to work in the education field, 86 percent support the idea of including climate change in the classroom.

The results also showed that the biggest reason the topic isn’t discussed in schools is that nobody seems to consider themselves an expert enough to broach the subject.

Why Don’t More Schools Teach About The Effects Of Climate Change?

As it turns out, there are several organizations out there offering some advice for both teachers and parents. Rainforest Alliance recommends using something like a simple houseplant to explain how humans and plants essentially live off the gases that each other produces. NatGeo suggests making recycling and planting trees a kind of game. You could incorporate a kind of allowance system for recycling efforts.

The key is to make sure our kids are better educated on the topic than we are. Make them activists at a young age, and they’ll be able to have a much larger impact than the older generations have had.