Abandoned Places Being Reclaimed By Nature

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When places go abandoned a new tenant moves in: Mother Nature. However, as civilization evicted her to begin with, it is rightfully hers, and this time she’s not leaving. These places, around the world have been abandoned and have now been reclaimed by nature.

New World Shopping Mall, Thailand

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The New World Shopping Mall shut down in 1999, after a large fire caused devastating damage to the roof. Left in disrepair, torrential rains flooded the lower levels, creating a large pond. The stagnant water was very attractive for mosquitoes and other bugs. In order to combat the pest problem, locals added Koi fish. The mall is now one of the largest urban ponds in the world.

Six Flags, U.S.A.

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New Orleans was devastated in August 2005 by Hurricane Katrina. The Six Flags amusement park, in the city was no exception. The 140-acre park was abandoned after the storm, as there was too much damage. Over 10 years later, parts of the park are still flooded and shrubbery is beginning to take over the rides.

Ta Prohm, Cambodia

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Ta Prohm is the name of a temple built in Angkor, Cambodia, in the late 12th and early 13th centuries. It was founded by Khmer King Jayavarman VII, as a Mahayana Buddhist monastery and university. However, when the Khmer Empire fell in the 15th century, Ta Prohm was abandoned. However, it has since been named a UNSECO heritage site and conservationists allow the nature to run its course. They believe the nature coming from the ruins gives the temple its picturesque ambiance.

SS Ayerfield, Australia

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Built in 1911, the SS Ayerfield once transported supplies during World War II. However, the vessel has since been decommissioned. It remained in the bay as there was a local ship-breaking industry. But, the ship was left untouched and now a mangrove forest calls the vessel its home. The boat is now called the “floating forest.”

Petite Ceinture, France

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The Petite Ceinture, or “little belt,” was a railroad that once circled Paris. Built in 1852, the railroad has since been abandoned as new technologies like the metro were made accessible. Now many varieties of plants cover the tracks and walls and 70 different types of animals call the tracks home.


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